Parents ‘should be prosecuted for not loving or ignoring their children’

A proposed change to the child neglect laws would make “emotional abuse” of a child a crime for the first time, alongside physical or sexual harm.
Mark Williams, the Liberal Democrat MP, is leading the calls for Britain’s “Dickensian” child neglect laws to be updated, ending an anomaly which means that it is crime to inflict psychological abuse on adults but not children.
Although social workers, who operate under a different legal framework, can already step in to begin care proceedings if a child is being emotionally mistreated, the police cannot.
This is because in criminal law only physical deprivation, such as denying children food or clothes, counts as neglect.
Mr William is bringing forward a bill in the Commons, with the backing of the charity Action for Children, to amend the Children and Young Persons Act to bring the two definitions into line.

Written by John Bingham. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Yeshiva University Chancellor Apologizes for Sexual Abuse Scandal

In an emotional letter on Monday announcing his retirement after more than 60 years at Yeshiva University, its chancellor, Norman Lamm, apologized for not responding more assertively when students at Yeshiva University High School for Boys said that two rabbis there had sexually abused them.

Dr. Lamm, who led the Modern Orthodox institution as president from 1976 to 2003 and has since served in the secondary role of chancellor, said his retirement afforded “a moment of reflection, gratitude, and appreciation.” He wrote that the timing of his departure had been set three years ago. But noting that the Bible encourages leaders to confess their shortcomings, he addressed the abuse, which students say took place during the late 1970s and early 1980s and came to light in articles in The Jewish Daily Forward beginning in December.

Written by Ariel Kaminer. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

South Carolina Is Faulted on Child Services

In South Carolina, people accused of sexually abusing children do not face trial for years. Children who report abuse are not interviewed for weeks. Churches often stand between victims and help.

Those were among the findings of a privately financed report that comes as South Carolina is working to shore up its child protective system. The state is facing lawsuits and legislative scrutiny after a series of deaths, rapes and other assaults on children who were in state custody.

The report was welcomed by Gov. Nikki R. Haley, who said it offered useful recommendations for improving how the state — both the government and its citizens — can better address childhood sexual trauma.

It also prompted Ms. Haley to recount her own experience as a physically abused child.

Written by Kim Severson. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Child Abuse Reporting Rethinking Child Protection

The general public has been bewildered by the magnitude of sex abuse cases and the widespread failure by pillars of the community to notify appropriate authorities. The crime of sexually abusing children is punishable in all jurisdictions. However, what is the duty to report suspected cases by individuals in positions of trust over young people, such as in the church or university sports?

Since the mid-1980s, law enforcement has been investigating allegations of sexual crimes committed by Catholic priests against young boys and girls. These sexual abuse scandals and lawsuits have cost the Church an estimated $2 billion in settlements.1 A 2004 US Conference of Catholic Bishops report found that law enforcement was contacted in only 24% of cases of suspected abuse.2 In other cases, the church hierarchy responded internally or not at all: priests may have been counseled, evaluated, provided treatment, suspended, or limited in their priestly duties.

Written by Susan C. Kim, Lawrence O. Gostin, Thomas B. Cole. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Accused of child abuse: A family’s story

It’s a Tuesday like any other. Then, in the afternoon, there’s a knock at the door. The dog starts barking and wakes our 12-week-old baby, Sam. My partner, Keiron, looks out of the upstairs window to see two women at the front door. We assume they are Jehovah’s Witnesses and Keiron leans out, saying he can’t come down. Then everything changes.

The women are police. They work in child protection services. Keiron, Sam and I go downstairs to find out what’s going on. They tell us to sit down and ask Keiron if he knows why they are here. He says no. Then they tell us an allegation about a sex offence made by a child at the nursery where he works.

My stomach turns to concrete. I have no shadow of doubt that this is a horrible mistake. I hold Sam in disbelief, calculating all the ways this is going to mess up our lives.

They take our computer away. I’m self-employed, so even though Sam is very young I am still working. I watch my livelihood vanish through the door and ask the police: “Are there any guarantees that it will come back unharmed?” No, they say, adding that it will be a minimum of four to six weeks until it is returned – assuming that it is clean of pornographic images of children. We’re told that paedophiles look at on-screen images of children before moving on to the real thing, so the computer will indicate Keiron’s guilt or otherwise.

Written by  . To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Spouse Abuse: A Disparity of Power

In the midst of the publicity about O.J. Simpson’s arrest and arraignment for the murder of his ex-wife, I’d like to ask the reader to contemplate a different scenario. How would the public have reacted if Nicole Brown Simpson had murdered her ex-husband? After nine calls to the police for incidents of domestic violence, culminating in a beating that hospitalized her but resulted in no jail time or long-term abuse counseling for O.J., what if she had shot him to death the next time he came to her house and became angry or threatening toward her?

Consider the extreme power disparity between the antagonists in this drama. Consider the message communicated by repeated calls to the police which resulted in no effective deterrent. Consider the impact of O.J.’s statement to the police (contained in the 1989 police report) that “This is a family matter. Why do you want to make a big deal of it?”- and the despair engendered by the failure of the legal system to protect her.

Written by Cynthia Grant Bowman. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Nanny pleads guilty after nanny-cam recorded abuse

NEW YORK — A New York City nanny has pleaded guilty to endangering the welfare of a child after a hidden nanny-cam caught her smacking a 5-month-old girl.

The Staten Island district attorney’s office says 52-year-old Mamura Nasirova pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts on Monday. The district attorney says Nasirova will be sentenced to 10 months in jail on June 14.

Nasirova’s employers installed the camera after they grew suspicious that the nanny was mistreating the 5-month-old and her 17-month-old brother.

Nasirova was arrested on Feb. 3.

Prosecutors said additional nanny-cam footage that emerged during their investigation showed Nasirova beating both children.

The district attorney’s office said Nasirova is not a U.S. citizen and faces possible deportation to her native Uzbekistan.

Written by ABC News. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com/