Parents ‘should be prosecuted for not loving or ignoring their children’

A proposed change to the child neglect laws would make “emotional abuse” of a child a crime for the first time, alongside physical or sexual harm.
Mark Williams, the Liberal Democrat MP, is leading the calls for Britain’s “Dickensian” child neglect laws to be updated, ending an anomaly which means that it is crime to inflict psychological abuse on adults but not children.
Although social workers, who operate under a different legal framework, can already step in to begin care proceedings if a child is being emotionally mistreated, the police cannot.
This is because in criminal law only physical deprivation, such as denying children food or clothes, counts as neglect.
Mr William is bringing forward a bill in the Commons, with the backing of the charity Action for Children, to amend the Children and Young Persons Act to bring the two definitions into line.

Written by John Bingham. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

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Yeshiva University Chancellor Apologizes for Sexual Abuse Scandal

In an emotional letter on Monday announcing his retirement after more than 60 years at Yeshiva University, its chancellor, Norman Lamm, apologized for not responding more assertively when students at Yeshiva University High School for Boys said that two rabbis there had sexually abused them.

Dr. Lamm, who led the Modern Orthodox institution as president from 1976 to 2003 and has since served in the secondary role of chancellor, said his retirement afforded “a moment of reflection, gratitude, and appreciation.” He wrote that the timing of his departure had been set three years ago. But noting that the Bible encourages leaders to confess their shortcomings, he addressed the abuse, which students say took place during the late 1970s and early 1980s and came to light in articles in The Jewish Daily Forward beginning in December.

Written by Ariel Kaminer. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Spousal Support and Bankruptcy

The dissolution of a marriage or civil union can be a very emotionally draining time for any family and may also come with serious financial consequences for the individuals involved. In some cases, individuals may be required to pay support to their spouse, children, and other dependents following divorce. In addition, there may be court and lawyer’s fees that must be paid following the legal proceedings.

Persons who go through divorce may have to assess their financial situation following their separation from their former spouse. If a person is facing serious financial struggles, he or she may consider filing for bankruptcy to relieve the burden of debt from his or her life. Although there are many types of debts that may be discharged through bankruptcy, support payments to spouses and children are not dischargeable debts.

Written by Bankruptcy man. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Divorce: Kids’ Health Is Compromised By Parental Divorce

Divorce is hard, especially on kids.

And according to Dr. James Sears of “The Doctors” TV show, parental separation can also compromise kids’ mental and physical health.

“Some of the things I’ve seen are depression, anxiety, oftentimes changes in sleep habits, nightmares, insomnia, bed wetting, distress,” he said on Thursday. “The lack of sleep and poor nutrition is a perfect recipe for an immune system that isn’t going to work as well and kids get sick more frequently — about 20 to 30 percent more frequently kids will get sick if there’s divorce.”

So how can you make the transition easier for everyone in the family?

Written by Huffington Post. To read the full article, click here.

Emotional Effects of Anger on Children of Divorce

Fighting around the children does more damage to them than divorce itself.

A study published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence shows that children exposed to constant parental bickering are more likely to be depressed. They are also more prone to expressing other “problem behaviors,” including substance abuse, aggression and poor school grades.

Never battle where kids can see or hear you. Little ears can pick up phone conversations as well as conflict behind closed bedroom doors.Parents often don’t think about the psychological impact of their arguments on children.

Never play one parent off the other to win your child’s favors. Bashing or demeaning your former spouse hurts and angers children in serious ways. Keep personal resentments personal and don’t use your kids as sounding boards. They’ll resent you for it and pay the price in stress, anxiety, depression and/or aggression.

Written by Rosalind Sedacca. To read the full article, click here.