Divorced, but Still in Business Together

Judy Rosenberg and Eliot Winograd have been business partners for 35 years as co-owners of Rosie’s Bakery, a 30-employee, $2.5 million Boston institution with four locations. Their marriage was less successful: It lasted two years, from 1979 to 1981, and “was not a good personal dynamic,” Rosenberg says. Despite their failure to make their marriage last, they attribute their ability to remain in business to mutual trust and admiration for each other’s business skills, among other reasons.

Figuring out how to sustain a family business after a divorce is important: Roughly 65 percent of U.S. businesses are family owned, with about 30 percent co-owned by spouses, estimates Glenn Muske, an entrepreneurship professor at North Dakota State University who has spent 14 years researching couples in business. Between 40 percent and 50 percent of all first marriages will end in divorce, a rate that has declined slightly over the past decade as marriage became less common, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Written by Karen E. Klein. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

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After the Breakup, They Help Sell the House

Lucky are the few who move out of their houses simply because they have tired of the view or suddenly possess the means to trade up. More often, it is a change in life circumstances that pushes people out into the housing market, something like a new job, a new husband or a new baby.

And lurking with quiet devastation behind many “for sale” signs is the big, sad shift that almost always requires that somebody move out: divorce.

For real estate agents and brokers, deals that spring from divorce are an inevitable slice of the business, and over the years, many find themselves gathering answers to questions they hoped never to ask.

How does one represent two people who won’t speak to each other? How does an agent show an apartment that has been divided by awkwardly placed locks or temporary walls? And what if your client’s highest priority is making sure their former partner does not come out ahead?

Written by Elizabeth A. Harris. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Why your law firm managing partner or chair should go social

Alexander Ingram (Alex_M_Ingram), an account coordinator at InkHouse Media + Marketing, shared some thoughts this morning on why your CEO should go social.

For years, CEOs protected themselves from the public and left most of the talking to their PR agencies. Regularly communicating in a public forum was simply not part of a CEO’s job description. Today, the massive onslaught of businesses adopting social media has provided a unique opportunity for finally personalizing the voice – and influence – of these company leaders. However, with a few high-profile exceptions (Richard Branson), CEOs have largely remained out of the mix, often too busy to take the time to participate in the incessant roar of the social channels. Executives, particularly the CEO, can provide a perspective that no one else in your business can, and social media offers a great platform to disseminate that message.

Ingram’s logic applies equally to managing partners or executive committee chairs at law firms. Despite social providing law firm leaders a unique and powerful opportunity, by and large, they’ve been silent.

Written by Kevin O’Keefe. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

56% of people use social media when looking for attorney

Pursuant to a recent survey by The Research Intelligence Group, 56% of consumers (72% of minorities) who looked for an attorney in the past year used social media during their search.

The survey commissioned by the Rainmaker Institute found that nearly one-quarter used a social media channel such as Twitter or Facebook to ask their friends for recommendations of lawyers or firms they have used for similar matters. Not unusual in that the leading place people turn when looking for a lawyer is a person they trust.

How did they use social media in their search for a lawyer?

21% of those searching for an attorney checked out the social media pages of lawyers or firms.
20% used social media to create a ‘short list’ of lawyers based on referrals and recommendations received through social media
Almost 20% vetted the names of lawyers they were considering with their social media contacts
Nearly one-quarter made a final selection of a lawyer based in part on what they learned through their social media contacts

Written by Kevin O’Keefe. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com