Inspirational Quotes: 10 Quotes To Help You Start Again After Divorce

In the middle of divorce, it’s important to remind yourself that life won’t always be so difficult. There will, in fact, come a day when you don’t struggle to pull yourself out of bed and get yourself to work. You won’t always want to take cover and curl up in the fetal position when someone has the nerve to mention your ex’s name.

Still, it’s hard to believe that things get better when you’re dealing with the stress of a split, so to help remind you, we’ve compiled 10 of our favorite quotes on self-preservation and rebuilding your life after a hardship.

Click through the slideshow below to read them, then head to the comments to share your favorite quotes or sayings on perseverance and moving on.

Written by Huffington Post. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbwookslaw.com

Abused Children May Get Unique Form of PTSD

Child abuse scars not just the brain and body, but, according to the latest research, but may leave its mark on genes as well.

The research, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that abused children who develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may experience a biologically distinct form of the disorder from PTSD caused by other types of trauma later in life.

“The main aim of our study was to address the question of whether patients with same clinical diagnosis but different early environments have the same underlying biology,” says Divya Mehta, corresponding author of the study and a postdoctoral student at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, Germany.

Written by Maia Szalavitz. To read the full article, click here.

Divorce: Kids’ Health Is Compromised By Parental Divorce

Divorce is hard, especially on kids.

And according to Dr. James Sears of “The Doctors” TV show, parental separation can also compromise kids’ mental and physical health.

“Some of the things I’ve seen are depression, anxiety, oftentimes changes in sleep habits, nightmares, insomnia, bed wetting, distress,” he said on Thursday. “The lack of sleep and poor nutrition is a perfect recipe for an immune system that isn’t going to work as well and kids get sick more frequently — about 20 to 30 percent more frequently kids will get sick if there’s divorce.”

So how can you make the transition easier for everyone in the family?

Written by Huffington Post. To read the full article, click here.

Emotional Effects of Anger on Children of Divorce

Fighting around the children does more damage to them than divorce itself.

A study published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence shows that children exposed to constant parental bickering are more likely to be depressed. They are also more prone to expressing other “problem behaviors,” including substance abuse, aggression and poor school grades.

Never battle where kids can see or hear you. Little ears can pick up phone conversations as well as conflict behind closed bedroom doors.Parents often don’t think about the psychological impact of their arguments on children.

Never play one parent off the other to win your child’s favors. Bashing or demeaning your former spouse hurts and angers children in serious ways. Keep personal resentments personal and don’t use your kids as sounding boards. They’ll resent you for it and pay the price in stress, anxiety, depression and/or aggression.

Written by Rosalind Sedacca. To read the full article, click here.

Elderly couples ‘need more relationship guidance’

Elderly people in the UK should be offered more relationship support to help them cope with older age, the Relate charity says.

Relationships play a critical role in dealing with the pressures of old age, but can fracture if they are not nurtured, costing the state more money.

Relate calls for a coherent government strategy and for support and counselling to be prescribed by GPs.

In a report, the charity calls for a new post of minister for ageing.

The report, jointly published with the New Philanthropy Capital, entitled Who Will Love Me When I’m 64?, suggests there are changes in the nature of relationships of elderly couples today compared with the previous generation.

Divorce rates of men and women over 60 increased between 1991 and 2011, it notes, whereas those of younger couples have fallen in the past 10 years.

Written by Hannah Richardson. To read the full article, click here.

Privacy of Mental Health Records in Divorce and Custody Proceedings

Trying to get inside someone’s mind has never been more challenging. We lawyers have to depend upon mental health care providers to tell us what is wrong or right about their patients/our clients. While mental illness, emotional, psychiatric and psychological problems are growing social problems, getting access to the information about someone’s mental health condition has never been harder. This issue is so important that this year it even got the attention of the Tennessee
legislature. Interestingly, communica- tions between psychologists and patients are placed upon the same basis as those provided by law between attorney and client.1 Thus, psychologist communications are confidential and privileged, unless waived.2 Communica- tions between psychiatrists and patients are similarly privileged, with limited exceptions,3 such as:
When a patient raises the issue of the patient’s mental or emotional health;
When a psychiatrist was ordered by the court to examine the patient;
To establish that the patient poses a substantial likelihood of serious harm requiring involuntary hospital- ization; and
Patient made actual threat to phys- ically harm someone and has apparent capability to commit act in the near future.
These limited exceptions form the basis for obtaining mental health records and present a challenge in domestic cases. For example, in custody matters, a court is instructed to consider themental health” of parents and caregivers to determine what is in the child’s best interests.4 In determining a permanent parenting plan schedule, either in a divorce or subsequent modification, the court is also instructed to consider the “emotional fitness” of each parent.5 One factor resulting in restrictions to a parent’s residential time in a temporary or permanent parenting plan is “emotional impairment” that interferes with the parent’s performance of parenting responsibilities such as providing for a child’s emotional, intel- lectual, moral and spiritual develop- ment.6 How is a court able to consider the mental health of parents in custody or parenting time modification cases when parents have a statutory right to privacy over their mental health records?

Written by Siew-Ling Shea. To read the full article, click here.