Protect 15 Million Child Domestic Workers

(New York) – Ten leading international organizations called on ministers of labor around the globe in a letter released today to protect child domestic workers and to ratify the ILO Domestic Workers Convention (Convention 189 concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers). The convention, adopted in June 2011, will help eliminate child domestic labor and improve the lives of an estimated 15 million child domestic workers.

The International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that children make up nearly 30 percent of the world’s estimated 50 million to 100 million domestic workers. These children often work long hours for little pay, and are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, forced labor, and physical and sexual abuse. The ILO has announced that the 2013 World Day Against Child Labor, observed worldwide on June 12, will focus on child domestic labor.

Written by Human Rights Watch. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

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From ‘‘I Do’’ to ‘‘I’m Done’’

It’s not a subject that marriage-equality groups tend to trumpet on their websites, but gay couples are at the start of a divorce boom. One reason is obvious: More couples are eligible. According to a report by UCLA’s Williams Institute, nearly 50,000 of the approximately 640,000 gay couples in the U.S. in 2011 were married. (Another 100,000 were in other kinds of legal relationships, such as domestic partnerships.) The marriage rate, in states that allowed it, was quickly rising toward that of heterosexual couples: In Massachusetts as of that year, 68 percent of gay couples were married, compared with 91 percent of heterosexual couples. Another reason for the coming boom is that while first-wave gay marriages have proved more durable than straight ones (according to the Williams Institute, about one percent of gay marriages were dissolving each year, compared with 2 percent for different-sex couples), that’s not expected to last. Most lawyers I spoke to assume that the gap will soon vanish, once the backlog of long-term and presumably more stable gay couples have married, leaving the field to the young and impulsive.

Written by NY Magazine. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Gay divorce, the next frontier

Margaret Klaw is a founding partner of Berner Klaw & Watson, a law firm in Philadelphia, and author of the forthcoming book “Keeping It Civil: The Case of the Pre-Nup and the Porsche & Other True Accounts from the Files of a Family Lawyer.”

When the Supreme Court ruled a key aspect of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional last month, it made a life-changing difference to many married same-sex couples, who will now be entitled to all the federal benefits they were previously denied. But those gay couples whose marriages aren’t working out remain in legal purgatory.

Divorce is solely the province of state law. If a couple who were wed in New York but live in Philadelphia want to be divorced, well, they can’t be. Not only is same-sex marriage prohibited in Pennsylvania — the court’s landmark ruling in United States v. Windsor does nothing to change that — but Pennsylvania’s “mini DOMA,” passed in 1996, provides that such a marriage entered into elsewhere is “void in this Commonwealth.” And if Pennsylvania doesn’t recognize you as being married, its courts have no authority to divorce you.

Written by Margaret Klaw. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Gay divorce, the next frontier

Margaret Klaw is a founding partner of Berner Klaw & Watson, a law firm in Philadelphia, and author of the forthcoming book “Keeping It Civil: The Case of the Pre-Nup and the Porsche & Other True Accounts from the Files of a Family Lawyer.”

When the Supreme Court ruled a key aspect of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional last month, it made a life-changing difference to many married same-sex couples, who will now be entitled to all the federal benefits they were previously denied. But those gay couples whose marriages aren’t working out remain in legal purgatory.

Divorce is solely the province of state law. If a couple who were wed in New York but live in Philadelphia want to be divorced, well, they can’t be. Not only is same-sex marriage prohibited in Pennsylvania — the court’s landmark ruling in United States v. Windsor does nothing to change that — but Pennsylvania’s “mini DOMA,” passed in 1996, provides that such a marriage entered into elsewhere is “void in this Commonwealth.” And if Pennsylvania doesn’t recognize you as being married, its courts have no authority to divorce you.

Written by Margaret Klaw. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Pro-Gay Marriage Republican Presidential Candidate Only A Matter Of Time, Top Consultants Say

WASHINGTON — Hillary Clinton’s announcement on Monday that she supported same-sex marriage was hardly earth-shattering. Who, after all, believed that the former Secretary of State, who publicly backed New York’s decision to legalize gay marriage, continued to draw the line on a federal level at civil unions?

But the statement — made in a video for the Human Rights Campaign — still signified the remarkable extent to which LGBT issues have become mainstream within the Democratic Party. As of now, it is difficult to envision the party nominating a presidential candidate in 2016 who doesn’t back same-sex marriage.

But what about the Republican side of the ledger?

Some of the party’s top strategists say it’s not unimaginable that, in a few cycles, Republicans too will nominate a candidate comfortable with the idea of marriage equality, or at least have a vice presidential candidate who’s a believer.

“Will we have a candidate who gets there? Yes. Will it be in 2016? No,” said John Weaver, who managed former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman’s 2012 bid.

Written by Huffington Post. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Redrawing the Family Debate

NEW YORK — When the television series “Mad Men” debuted in 2007, virtually everyone it portrayed was steadily (if not thrillingly) married, children tended to grow up with their fathers, women kept to their place, and nobody was known to be gay.

And then, over eight plot years, the future happens.

Women rise and seek equality. Marriages are fled more easily. Children start to grow up without fathers. Grandparents step in to help single mothers. Gay people peek out of the closet, and some straights seem unfazed. Marriage and childbearing are delayed for careers. Couples cooperate in child rearing without marrying. Double-income households let children slip through the cracks.

For a fictional series set half a century ago, “Mad Men” does a remarkable job of reflecting America’s present-day struggles with changing family patterns. It takes care to show how progress and decay walk arm in arm, how good change can sour into bad.

Written by ANAND GIRIDHARADAS. To read the full article, click here.