New child support guidelines

There are several changes from the current guidelines to note, including:

The 2013 guidelines calculate each parent’s percentage of total available income up to $250,000 per year and a “combined support amount.” This is a different method of looking at support as a total obligation of both parents.
The 2013 guidelines now clarify what is to occur when the combined income of the parties’ exceeds $250,000 per year. The guidelines are applied on the first $250,000 in the same proportion as the Recipient’s and Payor’s actual income compare to the total combined income. There is now a space on the form to list how much income remains available to either parent above the $250,000 combined total.

Written by Robin Lynch Nardone. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Bill to reform criminal law of child neglect fails to receive second reading in Commons

The Children’s charity Action for Children is calling on MPs not to ignore the needs of vulnerable neglected children after a bill to reform the law on child neglect failed to get a hearing in parliament.

Head of Public Affairs and Campaigns, Matthew Downie, said:

“We’re frustrated and disappointed that parliament wasn’t able to find time to debate this much needed law reform to protect neglected children. The current 80-year-old law is simply not fit for purpose and is failing hundreds of neglected children every year.

“We’re calling on the public to continue to remind MPs why children suffering from emotional and psychological neglect need protection. We were delighted that today, the professional body for social workers, the British Association of Social Work, publicly backed the campaign.

Written by Family Law Week. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Most babies born out of marriage by 2016, trend suggests

The majority of babies born in three years’ time will have parents who are not married, official figures suggest.

The proportion of children born out of wedlock rose in 2012 for the 40th consecutive year to 47.5%. By 2016 it is expected to rise to more than 50%.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics go back to 1938 when just 4% of babies had unmarried parents.

One former children’s minister called on the government to tackle family breakdown by supporting marriage.

Tim Loughton told the Daily Telegraph without marriage, people “drift in and out of relationships very easily”.

“In families where parents break up children do less well at school, are more likely to suffer mental health problems and are more likely to have substance abuse problems,” he said.

Written by BBC News. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Study: Religious Parents’ Divorce May Cause Children to Leave the Church

A new study has found that the children of religious couples are much more likely to leave the religion if their parents get divorced.

The study, published Tuesday in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, found that children who had two religious parents who get divorced are twice as likely to become estranged from their church as adultscompared to people whose parents didn’t get divorced.

“When both parents are religious, the effect of divorce has a negative effect on religiosity,” says Jeremy Uecker, a professor at Baylor University and lead author of the study. “They might think their parents’ marriage was ordained by God or something and that breakup can have more of an effect on their religiousness in adulthood.”

Previous studies have found a link between divorce and a child’s future beliefs, but Uecker says that the “effect has been overstated” because those previous studies did not take into account the parents’ religious beliefs.

Written by Jason Koebler. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Jailed for Nonpayment of Child Support – But it’s Not His Child

The feminists have ratcheted up the laws against men to such an outrageous level that paternity fraud is not just ignored, but routinely rubber stamped by the courts. Whether one agrees with the concept of child support or not, virtually everyone can agree that jailing men for child support over children who are not theirs is morally wrong. Men are routinely sent to jail for falling behind on paying child support, even though debtors’ prisons in the U.S. were mostly eliminated in the mid-nineteenth century.

The family courts and laws are set up in such a way that makes it very easy for a mother to collect child support, and very difficult for a man to avoid it. If a couple was married, the default law is that the man will be required to pay child support for any child born while they were married. In order for a man who isn’t the father to escape this outcome, he must obtain a paternity test and take a series of legal steps in court. Most states only allow a short window of time for a man to do this. If a man is not aware of the child, which he may not be if his wife or former wife doesn’t notify him of the child right away, he loses all chance to fight the child support, and will be on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars for the next 18 years until the child becomes an adult.

Written by Rachel Alexander. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Is Divorce Bad for Children?

Many of the 1.5 million children in the U.S. whose parents divorce every year feel as if their worlds are falling apart. Divorcing parents are usually very concerned about the welfare of their children during this troublesome process. Some parents are so worried that they remain in unhappy marriages, believing it will protect their offspring from the trauma of divorce.

Yet parents who split have reasons for hope. Researchers have found that only a relatively small percentage of children experience serious problems in the wake of divorce or, later, as adults. In this column, we discuss these findings as well as factors that may protect children from the potentially harmful effects of divorce.

Rapid Recovery

Divorce affects most children in the short run, but research suggests that kids recover rapidly after the initial blow. In a 2002 study psychologist E. Mavis Hetherington of the University of Virginia and her then graduate student Anne Mitchell Elmore found that many children experience short-term negative effects from divorce, especially anxiety, anger, shock and disbelief. These reactions typically diminish or disappear by the end of the second year. Only a minority of kids suffer longer.

Written by Hal Arkowitz and Scott O. Lilienfeld. To read the full article, click here.

Emotional Effects of Anger on Children of Divorce

Fighting around the children does more damage to them than divorce itself.

A study published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence shows that children exposed to constant parental bickering are more likely to be depressed. They are also more prone to expressing other “problem behaviors,” including substance abuse, aggression and poor school grades.

Never battle where kids can see or hear you. Little ears can pick up phone conversations as well as conflict behind closed bedroom doors.Parents often don’t think about the psychological impact of their arguments on children.

Never play one parent off the other to win your child’s favors. Bashing or demeaning your former spouse hurts and angers children in serious ways. Keep personal resentments personal and don’t use your kids as sounding boards. They’ll resent you for it and pay the price in stress, anxiety, depression and/or aggression.

Written by Rosalind Sedacca. To read the full article, click here.