Parents ‘should be prosecuted for not loving or ignoring their children’

A proposed change to the child neglect laws would make “emotional abuse” of a child a crime for the first time, alongside physical or sexual harm.
Mark Williams, the Liberal Democrat MP, is leading the calls for Britain’s “Dickensian” child neglect laws to be updated, ending an anomaly which means that it is crime to inflict psychological abuse on adults but not children.
Although social workers, who operate under a different legal framework, can already step in to begin care proceedings if a child is being emotionally mistreated, the police cannot.
This is because in criminal law only physical deprivation, such as denying children food or clothes, counts as neglect.
Mr William is bringing forward a bill in the Commons, with the backing of the charity Action for Children, to amend the Children and Young Persons Act to bring the two definitions into line.

Written by John Bingham. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

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Protect 15 Million Child Domestic Workers

(New York) – Ten leading international organizations called on ministers of labor around the globe in a letter released today to protect child domestic workers and to ratify the ILO Domestic Workers Convention (Convention 189 concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers). The convention, adopted in June 2011, will help eliminate child domestic labor and improve the lives of an estimated 15 million child domestic workers.

The International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that children make up nearly 30 percent of the world’s estimated 50 million to 100 million domestic workers. These children often work long hours for little pay, and are particularly vulnerable to trafficking, forced labor, and physical and sexual abuse. The ILO has announced that the 2013 World Day Against Child Labor, observed worldwide on June 12, will focus on child domestic labor.

Written by Human Rights Watch. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Yeshiva University Chancellor Apologizes for Sexual Abuse Scandal

In an emotional letter on Monday announcing his retirement after more than 60 years at Yeshiva University, its chancellor, Norman Lamm, apologized for not responding more assertively when students at Yeshiva University High School for Boys said that two rabbis there had sexually abused them.

Dr. Lamm, who led the Modern Orthodox institution as president from 1976 to 2003 and has since served in the secondary role of chancellor, said his retirement afforded “a moment of reflection, gratitude, and appreciation.” He wrote that the timing of his departure had been set three years ago. But noting that the Bible encourages leaders to confess their shortcomings, he addressed the abuse, which students say took place during the late 1970s and early 1980s and came to light in articles in The Jewish Daily Forward beginning in December.

Written by Ariel Kaminer. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com

Child Abuse Reporting Rethinking Child Protection

The general public has been bewildered by the magnitude of sex abuse cases and the widespread failure by pillars of the community to notify appropriate authorities. The crime of sexually abusing children is punishable in all jurisdictions. However, what is the duty to report suspected cases by individuals in positions of trust over young people, such as in the church or university sports?

Since the mid-1980s, law enforcement has been investigating allegations of sexual crimes committed by Catholic priests against young boys and girls. These sexual abuse scandals and lawsuits have cost the Church an estimated $2 billion in settlements.1 A 2004 US Conference of Catholic Bishops report found that law enforcement was contacted in only 24% of cases of suspected abuse.2 In other cases, the church hierarchy responded internally or not at all: priests may have been counseled, evaluated, provided treatment, suspended, or limited in their priestly duties.

Written by Susan C. Kim, Lawrence O. Gostin, Thomas B. Cole. To read the full article, click here. For more information on family law attorneys, visit our website http://www.jwbrookslaw.com